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Presenting a collection of Pacific Stage Lines ephemera, including a 1937 advertisement illustration for Hercules Engine Motors that I’ve colourized.

Jack Brown over at SurreyHistory.ca has compiled a comprehensive chapter on Pacific Stage Lines history, with much of the information provided by Murray Boyle, whom I suspect is the son of a Pacific Stage Lines bus driver, Dave Boyle. From the article:

Dave Boyle went into service as a Green Stage driver on a run to White Rock on May 23, 1923. He began his career with the Green Stages Ltd., and continued with Pacific Stage Lines. Here he is shown in his Pacific Stage uniform.

The entire history is a fascinating study of small entrepreneurial initiatives that were ultimately combined to create a more unified bus service spanning both sides of the Fraser River. I believe this aspect of our transportation history deserves more attention, and so as such, I present to you a compilation of various Pacific Stage Lines logos. More from Jack’s website:

An image that the traveling public was very familiar with was the Pacific Stage Lines logo of a flying horse in a circle. The line drawing of a PSL bus was also very frequent in many company advertisements.

The public name for bus services from 1926 to March 1962 was the Pacific Stages Lines. The service was chiefly an inter city carrier, but operated some local and suburban services in the Greater Vancouver area. Suburban service in Surrey began November 8, 1966.

Also presented here is a neat animated GIF which I created from a brochure of unknown vintage for Pacific Stage Lines’ parcel express service, showing the distances (in miles) that Pacific Stage buses traveled. If we had some vintage timetables, it would be neat to see what the ultimate travel times would be between these destinations! Special thanks to Mike Hocevar for his help with this post!

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Via Twitter: @ltmuseum: Richard Dennis, UCL, on the history of London buses in art 1829-1960. Using an umbrella on an open-top horse bus. http://t.co/oRgF9ByTEZ

Via Twitter: @ltmuseum: Richard Dennis, UCL, on the history of London buses in art 1829-1960. Using an umbrella on an open-top horse bus. http://t.co/oRgF9ByTEZ

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marmarinou:

Historical marker at Rondout, Illinois, March 4, 2006. (This sign later disappeared and then was replaced.)

marmarinou:

Historical marker at Rondout, Illinois, March 4, 2006. (This sign later disappeared and then was replaced.)

(via marmarinou)

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Symposium: The Social History and Cultural Significance of the London Bus
Date: Saturday 18 October, 2014
Time: 10.00-16.00
Location: Covent Garden
Tickets: Day ticket £40; Concession £35; Student £20

How has the London bus changed the world? From encouraging female emancipation, supporting the war effort in 1914-18, providing design classics and inspiring art the bus has become part of the cultural identity of London.  A one day conference for Year of the Bus, in which our prominent  speakers look at the iconic nature of London’s red double-decker buses, their social history, economic impact and cultural significance.

Symposium tickets include entrance to the museum galleries for one month from the date of the event.

More: http://www.ltmuseum.co.uk/whats-on/events-calendar#socialhistorysymposium

Symposium: The Social History and Cultural Significance of the London Bus
Date: Saturday 18 October, 2014
Time: 10.00-16.00
Location: Covent Garden
Tickets: Day ticket £40; Concession £35; Student £20

How has the London bus changed the world? From encouraging female emancipation, supporting the war effort in 1914-18, providing design classics and inspiring art the bus has become part of the cultural identity of London. A one day conference for Year of the Bus, in which our prominent speakers look at the iconic nature of London’s red double-decker buses, their social history, economic impact and cultural significance.

Symposium tickets include entrance to the museum galleries for one month from the date of the event.

More: http://www.ltmuseum.co.uk/whats-on/events-calendar#socialhistorysymposium

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Lost Destination: Stockwell Bus Garage
5 colour litho print on 120gsm uncoated art paper
H60 x W80cm

Designed by Adie, Button and Partners, Stockwell Bus Garage in London opened in April 1952 and was awarded grade II listed status in 1988. When it was first built the garage, which has a 393ft long roof and 73,350sq ft of parking space for up to 200 buses, boasted the largest unsupported area under one roof in Europe.

A new addition to a series of nostalgic travel prints designed by Dorothy and illustrated by Stephen Millership celebrating the unique but often forgotten beauty of some of our favourite modernist and brutalist architectural projects from the 1950’s, 1960’s and 1970’s.

more: https://www.wearedorothy.com/shop/category/lost-destination

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allleft:


By Alberto Reyes

allleft:

By Alberto Reyes

(via themovinglife)

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